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Christer Fuglesang (born 1957), Swedish astronaut, during a training session to prepare for the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS), departing in December 2006. Fuglesang is wearing a training version of the shuttle launch and entry suit, and is seen here in a fixed-base shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Photographed on 15th June 2006 in the Jake Garn Simulation and Training Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA.     Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Crew of the STS-116 shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS), departing December 2006. The crew are about to take part in a training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility to prepare them for the mission. The astronauts are, from left to right: Robert L. Curbeam, mission specialist; Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer; William A. Oefelein, pilot; Mark L. Polansky, commander; Joan E. Higginbotham, Nicholas J. M. Patrick and Christer Fuglesang, mission specialists. Photographed on 1st August 2005 at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA.     Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (born 1957), Swedish astronaut. A member of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Astronaut Corps, Fuglesang is a crew member on the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in December 2006. Photographed at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, USA in January 2003.     Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (born 1957) Swedish astronaut, using virtual reality hardware to prepare for the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS). The hardware allows astronauts to simulate use of the station equipment they will operate on the mission, which departs in December 2006. Fuglesang is wearing a special helmet and gloves to use the hardware. Photographed on 3rd February 2005 in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA.   Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (born 1957), Swedish astronaut, training for the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in December 2006. Fuglesang is participating in an underwater training session in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory near the Johnson Space Center. The water simulates the weightless conditions experienced in orbit. He is wearing a training version of an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), and performing a simulation of extravehicular activity (or spacewalks). Photographed on 7th January 2003 in Houston, Texas, USA.   Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (born 1957), Swedish astronaut, training for the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in December 2006. Fuglesang is preparing for an underwater training session in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory near the Johnson Space Center. The water simulates the weightless conditions experienced in orbit. He is wearing a training version of an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). On the right is the suit technician. Photographed on 7th January 2003 in Houston, Texas, USA.     Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (born 1957), Swedish astronaut, training for the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in December 2006. Fuglesang, wearing a training version of the shuttle launch and entry suit, is in a life raft during an emergency bailout training session. Photographed on 20th September 2002 at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory near the Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA.     Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (born 1957), Swedish astronaut, training for the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in December 2006. Fuglesang is performing emergency egress training, to prepare for an evacuation of the shuttle in an emergency. He is wearing an orange Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). Photographed at the Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA.   Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (centre), Swedish astronaut, using virtual reality hardware to prepare for the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS). The hardware allows astronauts to simulate using the station equipment they will operate on the mission, which departs in December 2006. Fuglesang is wearing a special helmet and gloves to use the hardware. Photographed on 7th August 2006 in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA.     Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (centre), Swedish astronaut, and other crewmembers of the STS-116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS). The crew, wearing orange Advanced Crew Escape Suits (ACES), are leaving for the Shuttle launch pad during the practice countdown on 16th November 2006. The STS- 116 mission departs in December 2006. Photographed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, USA.     Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Spacewalk training for astronauts. European Space Agency (ESA) astronauts Christer Fuglesang (right) and Thomas Reiter (centre) training to prepare for Extravehicular Activity (spacewalks) prior to the Euromir 95 mission to the Mir Space Station in May 1995. They are wearing cooling suits, which are worn underneath the spacesuit (left) during training. Water pumped through the coils of the training suit keep the astronauts cool as they train underwater in the watertight spacesuits. Underwater training simulates the weightless conditions experienced in orbit.   Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Christer Fuglesang (born 1957), Swedish astronaut, preparing for flight training on board a T-38 jet. A member of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Astronaut Corps, he is a crew member on the STS- 116 Space Shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station (ISS) in December 2006. Photographed at Ellington Field, near NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas in September 2002.   Foto: Science Photo Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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P648/096 Credit         : DR YORGOS NIKAS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Title          : Sperm on egg during fertilisation Caption:  Fertilisation. Coloured scanning electron micro- graph (SEM) of sperm on the  surface of a human egg (ovum) during fertilisation. The egg has a furry surface   (brown).  The sperm (coloured yellow) attached to it are hair-like structures;   each sperm has a head, neck, and a long tail. Here they are attempting to  penetrate the thick surface of the egg that attracts the sperm and enables them  to attach. The human female usually produces a single large egg, and only one of  the millions of male sperm released may penetrate the egg to fuse with the egg  nucleus. Once fertilised, the egg begins its process of growth into a human    embryo. Magnification: x1,600 at 5x7cm size. Magnification: x5,500 at 8x10 inch  size.
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P242/400 Credit         : SUSUMU NISHINAGA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Title          : Red blood cells, SEM Caption:  Red blood cells.  Coloured scanning  electron micrograph  (SEM)  of  red  blood   cells (erythrocytes). Red blood cells are biconcave, disc-shaped cells that  transport oxygen from the lungs to body cells. They circulate around the body in  the blood and also remove carbon dioxide to the lungs for exhalation.  Their red  colour comes  from  the  oxygen-carrying  protein haemoglobin. Red blood cells  are the  most abundant cell in the blood. They have no nucleus and are about 7  micrometres in diameter.
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M830/1528 Credit         : CHRISTINE HANSCOMB/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY Title          : Baby swimming underwater Caption:  MODEL RELEASED. Baby swimming underwater
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MODEL RELEASED. Gene therapy. Geneticist Dr D Kohn with a five month old Apache baby who suffers from SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency). The baby is receiving gene therapy for its condition. It is isolated in a sterile tent to prevent infection. The rare genetic mutation of SCID destroys the immune system making the body unable to fight infection. SCID babies lack a vital enzyme which their immune system needs. Gene therapy involves inserting a gene for this enzyme into stem bone marrow cells and transplanting the cells into the baby. With this enzyme, stem cells may produce normal immune system blood cells. Photographed at the Childrens Hospital in Los Angeles, USA.
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Hodges, Ken (19th century) Sir William Herschel (1738-1822) English C19th    Foto: Bridgeman Art Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Testelin, Henri (1616-95) Jean-Baptiste Colbert (1619-83) Presenting the Members of the Royal Academy of Science to Louis XIV (1638-1715) detail of the left hand side, c.1667 (oil on canvas) (detail of 104626) French C17th oil on canvas   Foto: Bridgeman Art Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Islamic School, (13th century) A veterinarian helping a mare to give birth, illustration from the 'Book of Farriery' by Ahmed ibn al-Husayn ibn al-Ahnaf, 1210 (vellum)  C13th vellum   Foto: Bridgeman Art Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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Islamic School, (13th century) Operation on a horse, illustration from the 'Book of Farriery' by Ahmed ibn al-Husayn ibn al-Ahnaf, 1210 (vellum)  C13th vellum   Foto: Bridgeman Art Library / IBL Bildbyrå
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